CHANGEpain Research Paper Reviews

 

The influence of psychosocial stress, gender, and personality on mechanical loading of the lumbar spine

Review by Courtney Zoschke

In recent years, the cause of low back pain disorders in the workplace has been actively debated. Prior research has focused primarily on identifying physical characteristics of the workplace that may influence biomechanics and spinal loading and subsequent injury risk.  Little work, however, has been done to assess how psychosocial stress may affect muscle activity and spinal loading. This study sought to investigate the impact of psychological stress on variables that influence spinal loading while controlling for biomechanical effects. The study also aimed to identify particular personality traits as a predictor for low back pain under psychosocial stressors.

Publication Information: Marras, W. S., Davis, K. G., Heaney, C. A., Maronitis, A. B., & Allread, W. G. (2000). The influence of psychosocial stress, gender, and personality on mechanical loading of the lumbar spine. Spine, 25(23), 3045-3054.

 

Expectancies Mediate the Relations Among Pain Catastrophizing, Fear of Movement, and Return to Work Outcomes After Whiplash Injury

Review by Yasmin Khalili

A great number of patients at our clinic suffer from whiplash-associated disorders following motor vehicle accidents that take away from their quality of life, comfort, and at times cause them to take prolonged time off work. Fear of movement and pain catastrophizing have proven to extend that duration of time that it takes for an individual to return to work post injury. The avoidance of movement based on fear and the exaggerated negative response to an unpleasant experience have been shown to result in greater disability for individuals suffering from whiplash, as well as many other injuries.

Publication Information: Carriere, J.S.; Thibault, P.; Milioto, M.; & Sullivan, M.J.L. Expectancies Mediate the Relations Among Pain Catastrophizing, Fear of Movement, and Return to Work Outcomes After Whiplash Injury. The Journal of Pain. Vol 16, No 12, 2015: pp 1280-1287.

 

Predictors of persistent pain after breast cancer surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

Review by Curtis May

Despite the increased longevity breast cancer surgery provides patients, 25-60% of patients are expected to experience persistent post-surgical pain. An updated systematic review of the evidence was done to identify the main predictors of developing chronic pain following breast cancer surgery and then how to reduce this risk.

Publication Information:   

Wang L, Guyatt GH, Kennedy SA, Romerosa B, Kwon HY, Kaushal A, et al. Predictors of persistent pain after breast cancer surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. Canadian Medical Association Journal. 2016;188(14):E352–E361. 

 
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Pain Acceptance Decouples the Momentary Associations Between Pain, Pain Interference, and Physical Activity in the Daily Lives of People with Chronic Pain and Spinal Cord Injury:

Review by Gurjeet Bhangu

Chronic pain acceptance is an important predictor of adjustment to pain. Preliminary evidence has illustrated that pain acceptance breaks the links between pain and emotional distress. However, no known research has investigated whether pain acceptance can decouple the connection between pain intensity and general pain interference or physical activity. This  review is on an article published in The Journal of Pain which examines the significance of pain acceptance in the context of chronic pain.

Publication information:

Kratz, A. L., Ehde, D. M., Bombardier, C. H., Kalpakjian, C. Z., & Hanks, R. A. (2016). Pain Acceptance Decouples the Momentary Associations Between Pain, Pain Interference, and Physical Activity in the Daily Lives of People With Chronic Pain and Spinal Cord Injury. The Journal of Pain.

 

Noninvasive Treatments for Acute, Subacute, and Chronic Low Back Pain: A Clinical Practice Guideline

Review by Carson Berry

This article is part of a series of clinical guidelines sponsored by the American College of Physicians (ACP). It addresses the important issue of low back pain. The Annals of internal medicine have a variety of series on many topics. If you’re interested in learning more about best practices in other fields check them out (if you need CME credits, they’ve got ‘em!)!

Publication information:

Qaseem, A.; Wilt, T.; McLean, R.; and Forciea, M-A. Noninvasive Treatments for Acute, Subacute, and Chronic Low Back Pain: A Clinical Practice Guideline from the American College of Physicians. Ann Intern Med. 2017;166(7):514-530.  DOI: 10.7326/M16-2367

 

 

The role of the microbiome in human health and disease: an introduction for clinicians

Review by Dr. Lindsay Rite

While gut health has been a long standing pillar at CHANGEpain, it appears to finally be getting some well deserved recognition in the mainstream research realm. Over the past month the British Medical Journal (BMJ) and the British Journal of Sports Medicine (BJSM) released a series on this topic. This week at Research Corner we will briefly review the BMJ article:

Publication Information:

Young VB. The role of the microbiome in human health and disease: an introduction for clinicians. BMJ 2017; 356:j831. doi: 10.1136/bmj.j831

 

New Persistent Opioid Use After Minor and Major Surgical Procedures in US Adults

Review by Dr. Lindsay Rite

Publication Information:

Brummett CM, Waljee JF, Goesling J, Moser S, Lin P, Englesbe MJ, Bohnert ASB, Kheterpal S, Nallamothu BK. New Persistent Opioid Use After Minor and Major Surgical Procedures in US Adults. JAMA Surg. Published online April 12, 2017e170504. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2017.0504